Mountain Chiropractic, P.C.

Michael R. Treinen, D.C.

About Dr. Treinen

Dr. Treinen grew up in Sioux City in western Iowa, the youngest of eight children in a neighborhood full of large families. He attended undergraduate school in eastern Iowa (St. Ambrose College and the University of Iowa) before enrolling in Palmer College of Chiropractic. He moved to Durango, Colorado right after graduation. After a brief stint as an associate doctor in another chiropractic clinic, he opened his own offices in 1984: Mountain Chiropractic.

Dr. Treinen serves as a Board member of the Colorado Chiropractic Association. He is the chairman of the Education Committee and Chairman of the Treatment Guidelines and Documentation Committee. In 2005 he was honored with the Colorado Chiropractic Associations President’s Personal Award for recognition of outstanding contributions and dedication to the chiropractic profession in Colorado.

Since his graduation from chiropractic school Dr. Treinen has traveled extensively and spent numerous hours studying and attaining advanced certifications in the fields of chiropractic. This training includes chiropractic and therapeutic exercise rehabilitation of the spine, sports chiropractic, whiplash traumatology and accident reconstruction. Besides frequently attending conferences sponsoring cutting edge treatment protocols for a wide variety of conditions he reviews the research published in a number of journals that pertain to whiplash and spinal traumatology, sports injuries, spinal biomechanics, soft tissue healing, nutritional therapy, and general topics important to health care.

Dr. Treinen has lectured across North America to audiences of doctors of all disciplines including: chiropractors, medical doctors, osteopathic physicians, acupuncturists, naturopathic doctors, and eye doctors. His lecture topics covered the uses of nutritional therapy for numerous conditions that affect every part of the body. Dr. Treinen is the author of Applied Nutritional Physiology, for which he researched numerous texts and hundreds of clinical studies detailing the uses of nutritional therapy for many conditions that afflict the human body. Any nutritional advice given in this office usually has its roots similar clinical studies. Thus, recommendations for nutritional remedies for our patients usually have a strong foundation of scientific evidence that supports the rationale for these protocols.

Because of the extensive research compiled in writing Applied Nutritional Physiology, Dr. Treinen was invited by a large international vitamin company to formulate combination remedies for various common health disorders. These remedies are employed worldwide by doctors for their patients.

In turn, because of the success of his formulations for common eye disorders, he was invited to and presented lectures on several occasions to the Annual Congress of the National Eye Research Foundation. These lectures were attended by eye doctors from all over the world.



Doctors of Chiropractic (DC) have been around for over 100 years, but many people do not know how extensive the education requirements are to attain a DC degree. DCs have an impressive education designed to prepare the doctor in portal of entry health care. Most people are somewhat familiar with the extensive education that MDs have and in comparison DC education is very similar with a difference in focus.

During the first two years of their respective four-year curriculums both DC and MD disciplines include a full grounding in anatomy, physiology, pathology, biochemistry, microbiology, and public health. During the second two years DCs focus on diagnosing and treating spinal and extremity disorders that will respond to chiropractic manipulative therapy; and in how to provide that therapy. MD training emphasizes external interventions – principally drugs and surgery – for a much wider range of conditions. The minimum DC program requires 4,200 classroom hours, but the average graduate of 16 chiropractic colleges in the U.S. completes 4,822. In comparison, the average of 17 medical colleges field graduates with 4,667 classroom hours.

The difference in education DCs and MDs is in the focus of the education in the second half of their respective programs. DCs spend less time on pharmacology, gynecology, psychology, pediatrics, geriatrics, dermatology, otolaryngology (eye, ear, nose and throat), first aid emergency, and other subjects that DCs spend little time treating. But on matters of neuro-musculo-skeletal conditions, which DCs spend most of their time treating, DCs have a much greater emphasis. In these subjects DCs have roughly 3 times the classroom hours of MDs, Osteopaths, and physical therapists

(DCs= 3,305, MDs= 918, Osteopaths= 1,207, PTs= 1,054).

After exhaustive research into the matter the World Health Organization advised that medical doctors or other health care providers interested in providing chiropractic services should requalify and be licensed as chiropractors. In particular, medical doctors desiring to provide chiropractic care should aquire no less than an additional 2,200 hours of classroom study over a two-year full-time program or a three-year part-time program, including not less than 1,000 hours of supervised clinical experience. Physical therapists would require additional training, because they have insufficient training in the pathological and diagnostic sciences.